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Effect of PK Plus® and a Fungicide on Microdochium Patch (Microdochium nivale) Incidence and Severity on an Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua) Putting Green - 2010

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Download this file (Microdochium Patch _ OSU _2010.pdf)Microdochium Patch _ OSU _2010.pdf[ ]718 kB

Effect of PK Plus® and a Fungicide on Microdochium Patch (Microdochium nivale) Incidence and Severity on an Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua) Putting Green (Golembeiwski, 2010)

Summary
Turf managers require alternate strategies for managing diseases such as microdocium patch (Microdochium nivale), prevously referred to as pink snow mold or fusarium patch, and specifically where the disease occurs as a chronic condition during cool, wet/humid weather. This chronic pressure occurs most commonly in coastal areas all season, or in the spring/early summer and fall in all northern climates, and can affect nearly all turfgrass species, however annual bluegrass (Poa annua) is highly suseptible. PK Plus® has been documented to effectively managing Pythium blight (Pythium spp.) and anthracnose (Colletotrichum cereale) as one component to an integrated approach to disease management (IPM), and remains the most rigorously evaluated phosphite containing fertilizer in the marketplace today. Scientists and turfgrass managers in Ireland recently reported less microdochium patch incidence on a Poa annua putting green previously treated with seqential appliations of PK Plus®.

Objective
The objectives of this research trial was to 1.) Determine the effect of PK Plus® (phosphite) on Poa annua overall quality and microdochium patch incidence/severity and 2.) Determine the effect of Iprodione Pro® (iprodione), applied with and without PK Plus® (phosphite), on turfgrass quality and disease incidence/severity.

Method and Results
The trial was initiated on a Poa annua putting green in Corvalis, OR on 2-Sept, 2010. Treatments were applied biweekly until 4-Apr, 2011 with a CO2 backpack sprayer in 88 gallons of water per acre and included PK Plus® 3-7-18 + minors (6 fl. oz./M), PK Plus® + Ultraplex® 5-0-3 + minors (3 fl. oz./M), fertilizer check (no phosphite)$, Iprodione Pro® (BASF)* (4 fl. oz./M), Iprodione Pro® (BASF) (4 fl. oz./M) + PK Plus® (6 fl. oz./M), and untreated control. The fertilizer check delivered an equivalent total nitrogen (N) rate (~3 lbs N/M), but no phosphite. Seven treatment applications had been made before disease was reported on 15-Dec, 2010. The highest percent disease occurred on 4-Apr, 2011. Significant treatment differences occurred in late December and continued through the remainder of the experiment. During periods of moderate disease pressure, all treatments provided significantly better turfgrass quality and less microdochium patch compared to the untreated contol (Figures 1&2). Turfgrass treated with PK Plus® alone exhibited less disease pressure compared to the untreated control, and significanly less disease than Iprodione Pro® and the fertilizer check on 4-April (Figure 1). The addition of Ultraplex® to PK Plus® did not enhance this effect. PK Plus® enchanced the funcide control of microdochium patch, and this combination treatment was most effective overall. Turfgrass treated with PK Plus® alone or with tank mix partners provided the best turf quality and excellent suppression of microdochium patch sypmtoms (Figures 2&3). While the fertilizer control provided better turf quality and a reduction disease compared to the contol, Poa annua treated with PK Plus® provided significantly better quality and less disease pressure, highlighting the importance of phosphite to manage this disease (Figures 1, 2,&3)%.

Conclusion
These results document the importance of using PK Plus® as part of integrated approach to managing microdochium patch on golf course putting greens. Routine and sequential applications prior to the onset of disease pressure is the correct way to use PK Plus and will maximize its efficacy. Additional cultural practices that will help to limit microdochium patch development are thatch control, enhancing drainage, balanced fertilization, and acidification of the rhizosphere.

$ Fertilizer Check included: Andersons 28-5-15 + micros, ammonium sulfate, Mora leaf P&K (0-50-30)
*Iprodione Pro is a registered trademark of BASF.
%Not all phosphites are formulated the same. PK Plus® is the only phosphite fertilizer scientifically document as an effective treatment to manage microdochum patch.

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Research From Oregon State University

  • Effect of PK Plus® and a Fungicide on Microdochium Patch (Microdochium nivale) Incidence and Severity on an Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua) Putting Green - 2010

    {attachments}

    Effect of PK Plus® and a Fungicide on Microdochium Patch (Microdochium nivale) Incidence and Severity on an Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua) Putting Green (Golembeiwski, 2010)

    Summary
    Turf managers require alternate strategies for managing diseases such as microdocium patch (Microdochium nivale), prevously referred to as pink snow mold or fusarium patch, and specifically where the disease occurs as a chronic condition during cool, wet/humid weather. This chronic pressure occurs most commonly in coastal areas all season, or in the spring/early… Read More +

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Research From Clemson University

  • Foliar uptake of nutrients applied in solution to Creeping Bentgrass, Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua), and Ultra-Dwarf Bermudagrass (2009)

    Title:
    Foliar uptake of nutrients applied in solution to Creeping Bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.),
    Annual Bluegrass (Poa annua var. reptans (Hausskn.) Timm) and Ultra-Dwarf Bermudagrass
    (Cynodon dactylon x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy).

    Publication Date:
    06-24-2009

    Abstract: Liquid applications of nutrients to turfgrass are a routine management practice. A better understanding of nutrient chelating chemistry coupled with a measurable increase in products marketed to turfgrass professionals purported to facilitate effective and efficient absorption of nutrients into turfgrass leaves has resulted in a need for… Read More +

  • Ultradwarf Bermudagrass Performance on Greensmix Differing in Water Holding Capacity (2003)

     

    Ultradwarf Bermudagrass Performance on Greensmix Differing in Water Holding Capacity (2003)

    Introduction
    Ultradwarf bermudagrasses have become popular in the Carolinas as an alternative to TifDwarf bermudagrass and bentgrass. In many cases, the new bermudagrass varieties have been planted to newly constructed greens or renovated greens that have very low peat and high sand contents. These high infiltration rate and low water and nutrient holding capacity mixes are typically used for growing bentgrass. Leaching of nutrients and… Read More +

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